GlobalEnglish

Globalization meets the office: four areas that drive the need for Business English

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Today’s organizations rely on Business English—While Business English knocks down borders, it also creates barriers for those who can’t leverage it. GlobalEnglish estimates that as many as 70% of the Forbes Global 2000 employees are non-native English speakers. Many of these individuals don’t possess the Business English skills required to do their jobs. Organizations that fail to recognize and address their Business English needs risk their customer relationships, their reputations and their revenues.

GlobalEnglish focuses on helping organizations improve their Business English capabilities strategically and operationally. We have learned that improving Business English proficiency helps all organizations improve their effectiveness across service and product offerings.

By tackling communications, strategic alignment, collaboration and problem solving and operational efficiencies, organizations create a solid footing for more of the strategic application of Business English.

Compelling communication. Business communications depend on a common foundation of Business English to engage and inspire. Individuals must not only know Business English, but have a command of the specialized ways their function, company and industry use it in all aspects of their work. GlobalEnglish gives your talent the vocabulary and context that allows them to communicate efficiently in Business English.

Effective collaboration and problem solving. Employees must work together effectively with peers, with customers, and with business partners. Organizations rely on collaboration to develop and execute projects, design, build and deliver products, and create services that cross national boundaries. And customers demand responsive vendors. Addressing obstacles, and working in harmony, requires a shared framework for understanding. That framework is often crafted in Business English. GlobalEnglish helps organizations gain the language skills necessary to build teams that work together well, overcome challenges and deliver value.

Efficient operations. Efficiency has become a theme for modern corporations as they seek to reduce waste, maximize profitability, and develop agility in response to market changes and technological innovation. Without a solid understanding of Business English, organizations risk missing opportunities, or reacting to threats in a timely way. GlobalEnglish provides its learners with the ability to meet the demands of today’s work environment, and the capacity to adapt to tomorrow’s needs.

Strategic clarity. Communicating strategy across the organization creates a cohesive approach to problem solving, a clear base for making planning and spending decisions, and a structure inspiring innovation. GlobalEnglish helps its customers communicate horizontally and vertically, from teams aligning their work, to executives delivering their vision.

Reach out to GlobalEnglish (http://globalenglish.com) and see how we can help your organization perform better today, and prepare better for tomorrow.

Myrna_HS
Myrna Rivera
Marketing Manager
GlobalEnglish

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An important new milestone

Four years ago, Pearson English Business Solutions (PEBS) embarked on a journey with Pearson. Our goal was to harnesses the power of technology and premium content to enable talent to communicate, collaborate and operate in a common language, business English. We have been successful realizing this vision, empowering diverse and dispersed global teams to communicate, collaborate and innovate by giving a voice to talent across cultures and geographies. Your passion and support of Pearson English Business Solutions has helped to make this success possible.

Today, we embark on the next leg of our journey. As we come to an important new milestone, I am pleased to announce that we have signed an agreement to sell Pearson English Business Solutions to its management team, which will become effective November 4th, 2016.

The current management team will lead the organization, with Karine Allouche Salanon continuing as CEO of the business. Other members of the management buyout team are Dean Cooper, VP sales, Valentine de Roubaix, VP customer success and Scott Ludeke VP Product. Sam Neff, who developed the first line of code for the PEBS solution 18 years ago, has joined the team as a Special Adviser.

Since acquisition, Pearson English Business Solutions has been an important and successful part of the Pearson portfolio and the business has benefited from significant product investment. Under the new ownership, you can expect to see the business continue to grow and flourish as the team remains focused on delivering solutions that bring tangible outcomes to your learners and your business productivity.

What does it mean for you, and for Pearson English Business Solutions?
I’d like to reassure you that the service you receive from PEBS will remain the same.

The management team is committed to continuing providing the products, services and support you’ve come to expect. We look forward to an ongoing collaboration with you, and with all our customers and partners.

These are exciting times and we look forward to partnering with you on this next chapter of growth and success.

For further information, you can access our customer FAQs.

Tas Viglatzis and Karine Allouche Salanon
Managing Director, Pearson English and CEO, GlobalEnglish

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Learning Employees Are in Charge

Deloitte’s Global Human Capital Trends report for 2016 reflects the views of more than 7,000 CEOs and HR leaders in 130 countries.

In a short series of blog posts we take a look at this year’s top trends, and analyze what they mean for talent management professionals and global employees.

Learning the Key to Success
Organizational learning continues to be a business priority for more than eight out of ten (84 percent) executives and HR leaders.

Learning is seen as the primary driver of employee development by 30% of respondents, as well as being an essential tool for attracting top talent, engaging employees, and developing leaders.

“In today’s highly competitive global economy and intensely competitive talent market, the C-suite clearly understands that companies that do not constantly upgrade skills and rapidly build leaders will not be able to execute their business plans.”

Warp Speed Disruption
According to Deloitte, nearly every CEO and CHRO questioned said that their companies are not developing skills fast enough or leaders deeply enough.

Advances in technology, and shifts in demographics are among the factors that have accelerated the disruptive change in corporate learning and development (L&D) organizations to “warp speed” over the past year.

“Employees at all levels now recognize that ‘the learning curve is the earning curve,’ and they are demanding access to dynamic learning opportunities that fit their individual needs and schedules.”

Learning How to Learn
High-performing companies are promoting a new culture of learning, focused on the employee experience. They treat learning as a continuous process, not an episodic event, and approach it from the perspective of an employee’s daily experiences and career aspirations, rather than as a centralized group looking to roll-out programs and processes.

The role of L&D is evolving from developing content to be pushed out to employees, to facilitating efforts to help “learners how to learn,” and enabling access to content from a wide range of internal and external sources to meet the specific needs of every employee.

“Despite the strong shift toward employee-centric learning, many L&D organizations are still struggling with internally focused and outdated platforms and static learning approaches.”

Learning New Tricks
To transform an L&D function to meet the needs of today’s global organization requires shifts in perspective, culture and technologies.

Put the employee at the center of the learning experience and meet their:

Immediate Needs – what do I need to support my success in the moment?
Intermediate Needs – what do I need to grow in my current role?
Transitional Needs – what do I need to grow in my career?

Recognize that this evolution from a content-centric to a learner-centric experience requires a cultural shift from a company-push approach to an employee-pull approach. Employees should be given the freedom to engage and schedule learning on their time in their terms.

Support an employee-centric approach with mobile, social, and web-based platforms that can deliver on-demand learning content and a better user-experience.

We took a look at the top five Global Talent trends identified by Deloitte from Organizational Design and Leadership Development, to Corporate Culture, Employee Engagement and Learning, and proposed ten actions for global talent managers to answer the call of C-suite. To download the report, please follow this link.

KarineHeadshot
Karine Allouche Salanon
Senior Vice President, General Manager
Pearson English Business Solutions

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A New Approach for Leadership Development

Deloitte’s Global Human Capital Trends report for 2016 reflects the views of more than 7,000 CEOs and HR leaders in 130 countries.

In a short series of blog posts we take a look at this year’s top trends, and analyze what they mean for talent management professionals and global employees.

Leadership is a Top Priority
The challenges of leadership development are an urgent and growing trend, with almost nine out of ten executives surveyed (89 percent) rating it as a top priority.

As organizations become more team-centric and business challenges become more global and diverse, fresh challenges in leadership development are emerging.

“Organizations need to develop fundamental leadership capabilities among critical individuals and teams—capabilities that include the ability to collaborate across boundaries, conceptualize new solutions, motivate diverse teams, and develop the next generation of diverse and global leaders.”

Leadership Training is Failing
Deloitte reports that companies spent $31 billion on leadership programs last year, but 24 percent of respondents said they yield little to no value.

Only 13 percent of companies say they are excellent at building global leaders.
Only 14 percent described their company as strong at succession planning.

“Too few leadership programs are designed on a foundation of research, clear priorities, and assessments of needed leadership thinking and outcomes.”

A New Range of Leadership Skills
As organizations grow flatter and more diverse, there is a need for leadership skills at all levels of the business. This means that organizations need to identify potential leaders earlier, and help them develop a broader range of skills.

As organizational design shifts from a structured hierarchy to a network of teams, leadership skills need to be driven by a culture of coaching and collaboration, not one of command and control.

Leaders must inspire teams that are increasingly multi-generational, cross-disciplined, and multi-cultured, which requires an inclusive attitude and strong communication skills, as well as strategic thinking skills and business knowledge.

The lack of diversity among leaders remains a problem, with 59 percent of respondents
reporting little to no investment in diverse leaders, with similar findings for Millennials (59 percent) and women (49 percent).

A New Approach to Leadership Development
Deloitte recommends a fresh approach to leadership development, in both its scope and execution.

Expand the use of online tools to identify high-potential employees from around the world earlier in their careers, and provide opportunities for younger leaders to gain the skills, experiences, and insights they need to thrive in leadership roles.

Become more scientific about leadership development by identifying the skills that leaders need, and then rigorously evaluating progress as they develop.

Develop a more diverse range of leaders by moving away from a one size fits all approach to leadership development. Create a range of training packages across business, communications, and cultural skills that can be tailored to meet the specific needs of potential leaders from different backgrounds.

We took a look at the top five Global Talent trends identified by Deloitte from Organizational Design and Leadership Development, to Corporate Culture, Employee Engagement and Learning, and proposed ten actions for global talent managers to answer the call of C-suite. To download report, please follow this link.

KarineHeadshot
Karine Allouche Salanon
Senior Vice President, General Manager
Pearson English Business Solutions

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Talent Management for a Future of Teams

Deloitte’s Global Human Capital Trends report for 2016 reflects the views of more than 7,000 CEOs and HR leaders in 130 countries.

In a short series of blog posts we take a look at this year’s top trends, and analyze what they mean for talent management professionals and global employees.

Organizational Design
Redesigning the organization to resist global competition and better meet the needs of local customers was the most widespread trend in this year’s report, with more than nine out of ten executives surveyed (92 percent) rating it as a top priority.

Traditional matrix-organizations with functional leaders at HQ and local teams in the field is proving to be ill-equipped for today’s high-paced business environments.

“Companies are decentralizing authority, moving toward product- and customer-centric organizations, and forming dynamic networks of highly empowered teams that communicate and coordinate activities in unique and powerful ways.”

The Rise of Teams
Deloitte refers to this trend as The Rise of Teams. Instead of permanently working in a specialist department or local division, employees are assigned to temporary teams focused on a specific business, product, market, or customer need.

Employees move from team to team as needed – similar to the way different specialists come together to produce a Hollywood movie – and then return to their “functional home” before being selected for their next team.

“This new mode of organization—a “network of teams” with a high degree of empowerment, strong communication, and rapid information flow—is now sweeping businesses and governments around the world.”

Collaborators and Communicators
The report says that: “companies should view employees fundamentally as resources of the organization rather than as resources of the manager,” which means that new recruits should be assessed on their ability to collaborate across the organization rather than just having the skills for a specific position.

Teams are driven by collaboration, which is fueled by communication. Employees in global companies need to have the skills to communicate effectively with colleagues at different levels, from different disciplines, and increasingly located in different countries. The Rise of Teams puts a premium on individual and group communication skills.

The most effective teams benefit from diversity of experience and thinking, as well as a range of functional skills. If organizations are to fully benefit from a team-based approach they need to create an environment, including the training where needed, for employees from every background to succeed across cultures and geographies.

We took a look at the top five Global Talent trends identified by Deloitte from Organizational Design and Leadership Development, to Corporate Culture, Employee Engagement and Learning, and proposed ten actions for global talent managers to answer the call of C-suite. To download the report, please follow this link.

KarineHeadshot
Karine Allouche Salanon
Senior Vice President, General Manager
Pearson English Business Solutions

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English plays a large role in Rio de Janeiro for 2016 Summer Olympics

It will be an exciting couple of weeks as over 500,000 people from outside of Brazil join thousands of Brazilians in Rio de Janeiro for 2016 Summer Olympics. Over 100,000 of those visitors will be American, and several thousand more will be British. In a country where Portuguese dominates, English will be a common language of exchange for commerce, for travel and transportation, and for healthcare.

The Olympics, by their design force an integration of English and French into the culture of any host city. In host cities where English or French aren’t the primary language the local language takes the lead. During the opening ceremonies in Rio, the United States marched out as “Estados Unidos” in the middle of the competitive pack.

But English will play a large role in the Olympics, not just because of the signage and the announcing. It might perhaps be even more important than in past Olympics as people try to stay informed about the Zika virus, or seek to be vigilant about terrorist threats, or understand issues about the environment.

As a host country, it is important to work well with your guests, and that means knowing their language even if they aren’t overly ambitious about learning yours. Those who know how to speak English are likely to be better compensated, attracting more U.S. Dollars and British Pounds than those who make customer transactions more difficult.

English becomes a lubricant that makes it easier to work with American and British tourists.

It is never too late to start learning some basics, and maybe the introductions to English that people take because of the Olympics will lead them to find value in continuing to learn English. The current issues with the Brazilian economy will resolve themselves, and Brazil will find itself again a leading economy for the 21st Century, and that will drive a need for English as the country increases its trade across the world.

On Friday, as the Olympic torch arrived at the stadium in Rio, and as the countries marched out together, I cheered for all of them, with a little extra for the French and the Americans because of where I was born, and where I now live. But I want to wish all of the Olympians very good luck as they demonstrate the power of finding common ground.

KarineHeadshot
Karine Allouche Salanon
Senior Vice President, General Manager
Pearson English Business Solutions

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Why Brexit may increase need for English outside of EU

When the UK vote to leave the European Union was cast, the makeup of the British labor force was a major issue in many people’s minds. Over 2 million people from European Union countries work in the UK. They have been able to work in the UK largely because of Britain’s membership in the EU which eased requirements still applied to workers outside of the EU and the Commonwealth.

No one knows exactly what is going to happen as Britain begins its exodus from the EU, but if the departure fails to recognize certain long-held agreements, many of those EU nationals living and working in the UK may be asked to return home, and many UK workers and retirees may be asked to return to the UK. Negotiations could also lead to a more reasonable transition, and a continuation of shared labor agreements.

But if the underlying issue of work immigration remains a major influence on policy, it may prove politically difficult for the UK government and businesses to continue to employ foreign citizens in UK-based jobs. The loss of this talent would leave UK businesses with a deeper skills shortage than they already face, and place the UK at a global disadvantage for companies in countries who can attract younger, more aligned talent. One approach, as this 18 February 2016 article from The Guardian How can the UK overcome a national skills shortage? Think local suggests is to form partnerships between universities and business in order to better align programs with local skill needs.

But there is another approach that will likely be a stop gap, even if more radical domestic policy reform takes hold: hiring talented people virtually from other countries.

While many companies already outsource some of their roles, Brexit could drive additional needs. Those needs will only be fulfilled, however, if people have the right technical and business skills and can communicate well with English-speaking managers and customers.

Countries like India already have strong ties to the UK and have been leveraging their UK relationships to open doors in the EU. The result of the vote could lead to even deeper ties between Indian and the UK as Indian businesses concentrate on UK opportunities (a 2015 Grant Thorton Study, India meets Britain, places Indian-company employment in the UK at 110,000).

The only thing that is really known about the result of Brexit at this point is that it has created a two-year horizon of uncertainty for UK businesses. One of the best ways to shore up uncertainty is to take action that brings near-term stability. If the foreign worker status is in doubt, hiring virtual workers to complement them is an action that won’t be affected by Brexit. If the foreign workers stay or go, those brought on virtually who perform well, will likely find a way to remain valuable to the businesses they support. But that all hinges on technically-savvy workers around the world being ready to tap the British talent need by knowing the language that drives UK commerce…English.

KarineHeadshot
Karine Allouche Salanon
Senior Vice President, General Manager
Pearson English Business Solutions

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